Archives for posts with tag: The Spoons

Best of 2019

Unlike 2018’s deluge, new music crept up on me this year. It was a steady stream of high quality albums and songs, with a few surprises. Album of the year for me was Beautiful Vinyl Hunter from UK jazz pianist, Ashley Henry. The new album from my all-time favourite band,  Incognito, Tomorrow’s New Dream places a close second.

Herbie Hancock | Kamasi Washington, Toronto August 7 2019

I saw a good amount of live music. My sophomore experience with Herbie Hancock had an added bonus with Terrace Martin in his touring band. It was also a double-bill with Kamasi Washington, so yeah, concert of the year. I also enjoyed Toronto’s own Daniel Caesar on a chilly autumn night at Toronto’s Budweiser Stage. Opening for him, another personal favourite, Charlotte Day Wilson.

A couple of surprises were albums from Sara Bareilles and the Spoons. I had never heard of Bareilles until I saw her perform on Saturday Night Live. Her album, Amidst the Chaos, really resonated with me, which was a little surprising since it is bordering on country, a genre I don’t usually explore or focus on. When I discovered T-Bone Burnett produced Bareilles’ album, it all made sense (I’m a fan of his musical direction on the now defunct TV show, Nashville). Another pleasant surprise was New Day New World from the Spoons, a band I’ve followed since I was in my teens. Late comers in the year were from Kaytranada (BUBBA, Kaytranada Music) and what seems like an independent and mostly instrumental release, Visions, from Jarrod Lawson on his bandcamp page, released under the artist name, Orpheus.

Albums

  1. Ashley Henry, Beautiful Vinyl Hunter (Sony Music)
  2. Incognito, Tomorrow’s New Dream (Bluey Music)
  3. Daniel Caesar, Case Study 01 (Golden Child Recordings)
  4. Salaam Remi & Terrace Martin, Northside of Linden, Westside of Slauson (Flying Buddha / Louder Than Life)
  5. Taylor McFerrin, Love’s Last Chance (FromHereEntertainment)
  6. Daniel Maunick, Macumba Quebrada (Far Out Recordings)
  7. Shafiq Husayn, The Loop (Nature Sounds)
  8. Shigeto, Versions EP (Ghostly International)
  9. Sara Bareilles, Amidst the Chaos (Epic)
  10. Flying Lotus, Flamagra (Warp Records)
  11. Jarrod Lawson, Visions (jlawson.bandcamp.com)
  12. Spoons, New Day New World (Sparks Music)
  13. Marcos Valle, Sempre (Conecta)

 

Songs (Listen to this playlist on Spotify)

My favourite songs of the year were from a wide swath of artists, some of them new to me this year. I was really taken with “Flying,” by Dawn Tallman. It’s a beautifully written, produced, and performed song. Tony Momrelle’s duet with his Incognito compadre, Maysa, is another. Jazz trumpeter, Yazz Ahmed was a new discovery for me this year. Her Arabic-influenced and atmospheric jazz is a fresh sound. There are some selections from the dance/house genre as well, “Sim City” being one of my favourites from the year.

  1. Flying, Dawn Tallman, For Me (Honeycomb Music)
  2. We Had Searched for Heaven, Tony Momrelle feat. Maysa, Best is Yet to Come (Vibe 45 Records)
  3. What You Need, Kaytranada & Charlotte Day Wilson, BUBBA (Kaytranada Music)
  4. Sim City, Space Ghost, Aquarium Nightclub (Tartelet Records)
  5. Don’t Stop, Monodeluxe & Jaidene Veda (Vibe Boutique Records)
  6. Lahan al Mansour, Yazz Ahmed, Polyhymnia (Ropeadope)
  7. To B, Da Lata, Birds (Da Lata Music)
  8. Dance with You, Sunlightsquare feat. Omar, Dance with You EP (Sunlightsquare Records)
  9. Afeni, Rapsody feat. PJ Morton, Eve (Jamla Records)
  10. Mesosphere, Ryan Porter, Force for Good (World Galaxy / Alpha Pup Records)
  11. Life is a Dancefloor feat. Kimberly Davis, Shapeshifters (Glitterbox Recordings)
  12. How Long Does it Take, Mildlife (Heavenly Recordings)
  13. Asa no Yume, Mark de Clive-Lowe, Heritage (Ropeadope)

 

New to Me (Re)discovered

Photo: patricerushen.com

In September of this year, BBC’s Gilles Peterson hosted an all vinyl special of his must-listen radio show with Patrice Rushen as his guest. Until then, I thought Forget Me Nots (and its ubiquitous sampling) was her singular claim to fame.

After I heard the program, I rushed to explore the rest of her catalogue and was bowled over by the impact she has made on jazz, R&B, and funk. Do yourself a favour listen to a Patrice Rushen marathon on your favourite streaming service or better yet, buy some albums. My current favourites are Patrice (Elektra, 1978), Pizzazz (Elektra, 1979), and Straight from the Heart (Elektra, 1982). Ms Rushen is still an active musician and music educator.

 

Passings

Some notable losses to the world of music this year: Ranking Roger of The English Beat and General Public, Johnny Clegg of Juluka and Savuka, Art Neville of the Neville Brothers, and Canada’s own John Mann, of Spirit of the West.

Aaron Neville. Photo: Erika Goldring/Getty Images

 

Anticipating in 2020

Terrace Martin has been hinting on his social media for some time that he has been working on his new album, DRONES. I’m also keen to see what Martin will do as producer on Herbie Hancock’s next album, which is also reportedly in the works.

 

Playlist: Toronto Retrograde

As Toronto hosts the 2015 Pan-Am Games, images of the city are appearing on TV regularly. It reminds me of how iconic our city has been over the years, especially in my youth when music videos drove pop culture, much of it bred by local talent.

And so, a playlist tribute to Toronto’s places and landmarks exposed by 80’s and 90’s pop culture .

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1. Having an Average Weekend, Shadowy Men on a Shadowy Planet (Matador, 1996)

Bay & College: The long-since displaced Addison car dealership flashed on the screen during the iconic opening of a now classic sketch comedy TV series, The Kids in the Hall.

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I’m an Adult Now, The Pursuit of Happiness (Capitol, 1988)

Queen & Soho: The empty lot on Queen street has gone through many incarnations but never gave way to new structures. It is a parking lot to this day, abeit surrounded by a much gentrified retail landscape compared to what’s depicted in this 1988 video.

 

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Lovers in a Dangerous Time, Barenaked Ladies (Reprise Records, 1997)

Markham & Brimorton: This suburban neighbourhood is the likely location for this memorable video. The Real McCoy Hamburger & Pizza joint pictured is still there today (1033 Markham Road).

 

Photo: Rick McGinnis

Photo: Rick McGinnis

Lakeside Park, Rush (Anthem, 1975)

CNE / Ontario Place: Although a fairground near drummer Neil Peart’s hometown of Port Dalhousie was the true inspiration to this song, it could easily have been about summer nights at the Canadian National Exhibition and Ontario Place. Those of us old enough to remember the original Ontario Place Forum fondly recall open air concerts by the lake from some of our favourite bands.

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Romantic Traffic, The Spoons (Ready Records, 1984)

Yonge & Sheppard: Shot in Toronto’s subway system, it was one of the more ‘democratic’ music videos of the era as most everyone who heard this song had been to the same locations many times.

sunnyside3_468

Photo: Enzo DiMatteo

Echo Beach, Martha and the Muffins (Virgin Records, 1980)

Sunnyside Beach: Echo Beach is an imaginary place but the song is said to have been inspired by this popular beach in Toronto’s west end.

 

 

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Spadina Bus, The Shuffle Demons (Stubby Records, 1986)

Spadina & Dundas: Toronto’s native beatniks made Chinatown cool and introduced a form of jazz into 80’s popular music at a time when the synthesizer reigned. It was also a welcome dose of goofiness amidst the pulled-down goth hairdos of the time.

June 01,1964 file photo

June 01,1964 file photo

Fifty-Mission Cap, The Tragically Hip (Universal Music, 1992)

Maple Leaf Gardens: A Toronto playlist would not be complete without mention of our long-suffering hockey team. The hockey card trivia cited in these lyrics bring back memories of hockey card collecting and trading.

 

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Rise Up, The Parachute Club (RCA, 1983)

Roy Thomson Hall: Our distinctive volcano-shaped concert hall was in its inaugural year when the Parachute Club shot this feel-good summer video.

 

Photo: Jorge Zontal

Photo: Jorge Zontal

Never Said I Love You, The Payolas feat. Carol Pope (A&M, 1983)

Queen Street West: Carol Pope is an icon of alternative Canadian music – a scene that flourished in the arts-infused western reaches of Queen Street between University Avenue and Dufferin Street.

 

 

Photo: spiritofradio.ca

Photo: spiritofradio.ca

Spirit of Radio, Rush (Anthem, 1980)

340 Main St. Brampton: The humble suburban address of one of the most influential radio stations in popular music. CFNY was incubated in this space and grew to become THE station for Southern Ontario’s youth through the 80’s. Rush wrote this song as a tribute to the station and a philosophy that put music first, challenging the commercial norms of the day.