Archives for posts with tag: Madonna

2015 Year in Review: New and New to Me

For me, the year in music was characterized by breakouts and comebacks. Hard-at-work artists toiling in obscurity finally broke into the main. Legendary artists returned with quality works reminding us of why they are great.

In the breakout category, Kamasi Washington tops the list and gets my vote for album of the year, by far. In addition, three artists who I learned about through Gilles Peterson finally released new material, earning much-deserved notoriety: Lion Babe, Hiatus Kaiyote, and Ady Suleiman.

In the legend category, we had D’Angelo (his album dropped Dec 2014 but lets not split hairs), Jill Scott, Madonna, and Prince.

Favourite Albums

  1. Kamasi Washington, The Epic (Brainfeeder)
  2. Ady Suleiman, This is my EP (Sony)
  3. Lion Babe, Lion Babe EP (Outsiders/Polydor)
  4. D’Angelo and the Vanguard, Black Messiah (RCA/Sony)
  5. The Cookers Quintet, Vol. 2 (Do Right Music)
  6. Prince, HitnRun Phase Two (NPG Records)
  7. Haitus Kayote, Choose Your Weapon (Sony)
  8. The Rebirth, Being Thru the Eyes of a Child (Walk Talkin)
  9. Oddisee, The Good Fight (Mello Music Group)
  10. Jill Scott, Woman (Atlantic/WEA)
  11. Bluey, Life Between the Notes (Shanachie)
  12. Pete Josef, Colours EP (Sonar Kollectiv)
  13. Fourplay, Silver (Concord Music)
  14. Jamie Woon, Making Time (Polydor)
  15. Madonna, Rebel Heart (Live Nation/Interscope)

Favourite Tracks

  1. “Get Down,” Muz’art (Dream Team SA)
  2. “Elevator (Going Up),” Louie Vega feat. Monique Bingham (Vega Records)
  3. “Backyard Party,” R. Kelly, The Buffet (RCA / Sony)
  4. “Cel U Lar Device,” Erykah Badu, But you Caint Use my Phone (Motown / UMG)
  5. “Can’t Forget You,” RAC feat. Chelsea Lankes (Battestation Records)
  6. “Psychic,” XL Middleton, Tap Water (Mo Funk Records/Crown City Ent.)
  7. “Live your Life,” Pete Josef, Colour (Sonar Kollectiv)
  8. “Am I Wrong,” Anderson .Paak feat. ScHoolboy Q (Art Club / Empire)
  9. “Them Changes,” Thundercat, The Beyond / Where the Giants Roam (Brainfeeder)

New to Me (Rediscovered)

Every year, I’m keen to discover an artist or musical sub genre that made a mark on music but was unknown to me. This year, I made three musical finds of note.

Lonnie Liston Smith, a great soul, jazz, and funk keyboardist, has been making music for decades and likely inspired many of the musicians I follow today. His body of work is as broad as it is deep. For a George Duke and Roy Ayers fine such as myself, being oblivious to Lonnie Liston Smith is embarrassing. For the similarly wretched and uninitiated, I would recommend Explorations – The Columbia Years (Sony, 2002) as a nice primer.

For years, I’ve known of Vince Guaraldi Trio and their iconic music for the Charlie Brown TV specials. What I hadn’t heard in full until this Christmas was A Charlie Brown Christmas – Expanded Edition (Concord Music Group, 2012). It is a remarkable album, not only for the Holiday season but for any occasion when you need a dose of downtempo cool jazz. The instrumental version of “Christmas Time is Here” is one of the most sublimely perfect recordings of a piano, drum kit, and double bass.

Last but not least, seeing Incognito live and meeting Jean-Paul ‘Bluey’ Maunick was the musical highlight of my year.

Anticipating in 2016…

For the past five years, I’ve lamented the ever-postponed debut album from KING. Happily, it has a release date early in 2016 and I’ve already pre-ordered a download.

Omar (a.k.a. Omar Lye-Fook) released a single last year, suggesting a full length album is in the works. If it is anywhere near as good as The Man (Shanachie, 2013) – my pick for best album of 2013 – it will be worth the wait.

We may also see a sophomore album from soul/jazz breakthrough artist, Jarrod Lawson, who incidentally has hinted a collaboration with the aforementioned Omar is something he would like to do.

Happy, peaceful, and musical 2016!

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Book Review: Le Freak: An Upside Down Story of Family, Disco, and Destiny, Nile Rodgers (Random House, 2011)

lefreak

Nile Rodgers is a mandarin of pop music. His discography is littered with colossal hits like Bowie’s Let’s Dance, Madonna’s Like a Virgin, and Duran Duran’s “The Reflex.” These Eighties icons were follow-ups to 70’s icons like CHIC, Sister Sledge, and Diana Ross. Despite his superstar buddies with big personalities, Rodgers’ autobiography reveals him as a behind-the-scenes-music-theory-wonk.

Rodgers’ prose is crisp, easy to read, and his story is captivating. I didn’t expect to be all that interested in his childhood. But Rodgers manages to tell a fascinating tale about his early years, being raised by “junkies” as he referred to his biological mother and adoptive step-father.

The insight into his early years reveals something about the uniqueness of Nile Rodgers. He was an outsider in most circles and ultimately found himself at home with other outsiders. His anecdote about being out in LA at a young age and spotting a group of “freaks” across the street, engaging them in conversation, and later the same night dropping acid with Timothy Leary, seems torn from the pages of a neo-noir pulp novel. Later in life but still before his breakthrough, a personal intrigue with Roxy Music spawned the idea for CHIC as a concept band. That an American-born-and-raised a black touring and session guitarist with R&B and funk roots became fascinated with a British white glam group doing art rock was…weird. And thus is Nile Rodgers’ musical pedigree. Thank goodness.

The rise and fall of CHIC is a fantastic read. Rodgers delves into the creative process he and long-time collaborator Bernard Edwards used to pen their barn-full of smash hits. The precipitous fall of CHIC as the “disco sucks” movement rose was felt acutely by the duo but they are vindicated today to be sure. My post, In Defence of Disco, discusses that public rejection, which was so palpable as the seventies closed out.

Bernie_Edwards_Nile_Rodgers

Bernard Edwards and Nile Rodgers

Rodgers had a massive second wind through his production of David Bowie, Madonna, and Duran Duran in the 80’s. There is scrumptious detail about Bowie’s Let’s Dance album and the evolution of Madonna from a streetwise and business savvy recording artist to an international pop icon.

As I read the book, I found myself uttering, “oh, he wrote that song” and “that was him?” and “him again?” on every other page. Rodgers’ fingerprints and guitar licks are on so many hit records, you wonder why most people have never heard of him.

Which brings us back to Rodgers as a ‘geek.’ Being behind the scenes was a deliberate strategy for Rodgers and Edwards. They were more focussed on the quality and meaning of the music than the celebrity it would garner. Watch some Nile Rodgers interviews and lectures on YouTube (like this one) and you’ll see what I mean. He describes with glee the secret of CHIC, which was to utilize complex jazz chords in a funky way to trick the listener into thinking it was basic. “It’s what you don’t play that matters,” is a mantra he borrows from Miles Davis and applies artfully to his music.

Le Freak: An Upside Down Story of Family, Disco, and Destiny is a great read not only for music lovers and fans of CHIC but for anyone interested in the evolution of a career and an impressive legacy from the humblest of beginnings.