Archives for posts with tag: Janet Jackson

Terrace Martin Presents the Pollyseeds: Sounds of Crenshaw Vol. 1 (Ropeadope, 2017)

Terrace Martin’s last album, Velvet Portraits (Ropeadope, 2016) remains one of my favourite albums from the last few years. I wasn’t expecting a follow-up this soon but it has arrived with the Sounds of Crenshaw Vol. 1. I already can’t wait for Vol. 2. 

Like Portraits, this project offers a wide range of collaborations that are distinct enough to stand up to repeated listening but similar enough to underpin a stylistic theme to the album. In Sounds of Crenshaw Vol. 1, Martin delivers a classy homage to slow jams and quiet storm while keeping jazz at its core.

“Wake Up,” in particular is a bluesy jazz ballad, apparently performed by Kamasi Washington (channelling Wayne Shorter I might add). According to Rolling Stone (link below), Martin’s sax is only credited on the cover of Janet Jackson’s “Funny How Time Flies.” Other tracks with a heavier jazz pedigree are “Believe” and “Mamma D/Liemert Park.” “Believe” sounds like an instrumental reprise of “Think of You” from Portraits. It’s a simple example of how great musicians can innovate variations on basic structures and create something entirely fresh.

Stronger R&B treatment can be found on slow jams like “Don’t Trip” and “You and Me,” the latter featuring the return of Rose Gold, who had delivered a memorable performance in “Think of You.”

Martin also serves up more electronically influenced downtempo numbers. “Your Space” features Wyann Vaughn, daughter of Wanda and Wayne Vaughn, who by association with Maurice White, is R&B royalty. In “Up Up and Away,” we hear a helium voice effect, perhaps an ode to the late Prince who used it, as only he could at the time, on Breakfast Can Wait (NPG Records, 2014).

Martin and his collaborators reveal a rich depth in the space between jazz and R&B. They are not the first to traverse these genres but they are among the best in the world right now.

The Pollyseeds Collective

Terrace Martin (saxophone), Robert Glasper (keyboards), Kamasi Washington (saxophone), Wyann Vaughan (vocals), Rose Gold (vocals), Trevor Lawrence Jr. (drums), Marlon Williams (guitar), Brandon Eugene Owens (bass), Taber Gable (piano), Jonathan Barber (drums), Curlee Martin (drums), Robert Searlight (percussion), Chachi (vocals), Preston Harris (vocals)

There may be other members of the Pollyseeds collective. The above is the most comprehensive list I could compile based on various online sources. There does not appear to be an official listing from the label.

Further Reading

Must Listen

  • This studio performance of the track, “Think of You” from the Velvet Portraits album is a master class in sublime
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Album Review: 99.9%, Kaytranada (HW&W Recordings, May 2016)

kaytraKaytranada (a.k.a. Louis Kevin Celestin) has made a splash that continues to ripple through some of today’s most sought after music. The Montreal-based producer, DJ, and musician released his debut full-length album earlier this year and has already won praise from peers and the industry alike.

99.9% is a fifteen track gift, laden with beats, melodies, and vocal collaborations that set it apart from purely instrumental and ambient electronic music. In fact, the ‘electronic’ label hardly suits this work. It is too artfully crafted and curated to be associated with programmed machine music.

Featuring a ‘just-right’ mix of R&B, electronic, and hip-hop tracks, the album has staying power. A slow jam like “Got it Good” featuring vocalist Craig David is complemented by the deep house of “Leave me Alone” featuring Shay Lia. More innovative and offbeat tracks like “Lite Spots” and “Bullets” featuring Little Dragon place Kaytranada on the vanguard and explain why he’s been so successful attracting acclaimed collaborators like Anderson .Paak.

One of the marks of a great album is its ability to attract your ear to different tracks at different times. When I first bought this record, “One too Many” featuring Phonte was on endless repeat. Now, after some distance and listening with fresh ears, “Weight Off” featuring BADBADNOTGOOD is irresistable. The two tracks are vastly different but maintain a coolness that Kaytranada seems to breathe into his music.

Related Listening

  • This Kaytranada remix of Janet Jackson’s ‘If’ is outstanding and never tires
  • British pop singer Katy B collaborated with Kaytranada on the beautiful title track of her Honey album. It also appears to be loosely re-imagined on 99.9% as the track, “Vivid Dreams” featuring River Tiber
  • The last ‘electronic’ album review I raved about was Miguel Migs’ Dim Division (Soul Heaven Records, 2014). A tip of the hat to an electronic music elder seemed apt since since Migs is 20-years senior to Mr. Celestin.