Archives for posts with tag: George Benson

Playlist: The Autobiography of Quincy Jones, Quincy Jones (Doubleday, 2001)

Having recently read this account of producer Quincy Jones, a.k.a. ‘Q’s life, I’m inspired to assemble a playlist from his far-reaching and remarkable career. Taken from moments that struck me in the book as particularly germane to his becoming a living legend, the playlist covers influences, legacy recordings, and turning points that slingshotted him further and further into the straosphere of jazz and pop music.

The book itself is a quick read, especially for those like me who are jazz history wonks. Jones has worked, it seems, with nearly everyone to make a mark on jazz music and has set the stage for countless pop sensations, notably Michael Jackson. Jones writes about his humble beginnings, his brother Lloyd, his beloved father, and the troubling mental health saga that plagued his relationship with his mother. Various chapters are also contributed by guest writers and offer insights into his life story from those that see him differently than he does himself.

The book is a few years old but I found it timely and a fitting complement to the “Quincy” documentary currently streaming on Netflix (2018). Jones turns 86 on March 14, 2019.

My Quincy Jones Playlist

Listen on Spotify

[Jones’ credits: PD-Producer, CP-Composer, AR-Arranger]

“Fly me to the moon,” Frank Sinatra with the Count Basie Orchestra, 1965 [AR] // Jones had idolised and met Basie at the age of 13; they enjoyed a long professional and personal friendship.

“What I’d Say,” Ray Charles, 1959 // Charles was one of the first musicians that inspired Jones; they were 16 and 14 respectively when they first met.

“Kingfish,” Lionel Hampton, 1951 [CP] // Written by Jones at the age of 18; He joined Hampton’s band around this time, which was one of the hottest big bands of the time.

“Wail Bait,” Clifford Brown, 1954 [CP] // Jones toured Europe with Clifford Brown while they were both part of Lionel Hampton’s band; Brown included this Jones composition on his first album.

“L’il Darlin’,” Count Basie, Composed and Arranged by Neal Hefti, 1957 // Hefti wrote and arranged this number for Count Basie; Jones states that it was a master class of “in-the-pocket tempo,” and served as a lesson that stayed with him all through his life.

“My Old Flame,” Dinah Washington from the album, For Those in Love, 1955 [AR] // The first album Jones did with Dinah Washington, who had advocated for him with her record label before he gained widespread notoriety as an arranger.

“I Can’t Stop Loving You,” Count Basie, 1963 [AR] // This recording earned Jones his first Grammy award.

“Firebird Suite,” Igor Stravinsky, 1910 // Jones has a second-degree connection to Stravinsky, via his tutelage by the great French teacher, Nadia Boulanger; Boulanger was a contemporary and friend of Stravinsky’s and was a teacher to many modern arrangers, including Aaron Copland, Philip Glass, and Michel Legrand; Jones had gone to Paris in part to work on arranging strings, an opportunity not afforded to black musicians in America.

“The Birth of a Band,” Quincy Jones, 1959 [CP] // Jones toured intensely through Europe with his own band and created this album around the same time period; The tour was a financial drain and lead to more commercial priorities for Jones upon his return to the USA.

“It’s My Party,” Leslie Gore, 1963 [PD] // Jones’ first hit as a Producer and of a pop song.

“Theme from ‘The Pawnbroker’,” Quincy Jones, 1965 [CP, AR] // Jones’ first major film score.

“Theme from ‘Ironside’,” Quincy Jones, 1967 [CP, AR] // The synthesizer used in the opening phrase was the first time the instrument was used for a TV score; In this period of his life, Jones was in demand for scoring but was simultaneously leading Frank Sinatra’s band at his residency at The Sands in Las Vegas.

“Walking in Space,” Quincy Jones, 1969 [CP, PD] // Shifting away from scoring and moving back toward Jazz, Jones recorded this early jazz fusion album. This was a year prior to Miles Davis‘ release of Bitches Brew, often said to mark the arrival of electric instrumentation in jazz music.

“Body Heat,” Quincy Jones, 1974 [CP, AR, PD] // Jones assembled a remarkable group of musicians for this steamy R&B/Jazz/Funk recording including Herbie Hancock, Hubert Laws, Bob James, and vocalist Leon Ware; The album was near-platinum, selling over 800,000 copies.

“Stomp!” The Brothers Johnson, 1980 [PD] // Jones produced all four multi-platinum albums by The Brothers Johnson; This song was co-written by Rod Temperton, a collaborator that would work with Jones and pen many of Michael Jackson’s monster hits, including “Rock with You” and “Thriller.”

“The Girl Is Mine,” Michael Jackson feat. Paul McCartney, 1982 [PD] // The first single from Thriller was a “red herring” according to Jones who worked with the team finishing the album while this track rose to Number 2 on Billboard’s Hot 100; Once released, the album and monster hits like “Billy Jean” and “Beat It” ‘inhaled the charts,’ writes Jones.

“We Are the World,” USA for Africa, 1985 [PD] // Jones’ account of this project and the now iconic recording session is a fun read.

“Beautiful Black Girl,” Quincy Jones, 1975 [PD, AR, CP] // This track from Jones’ Mellow Madness album featured spoken verse overtop beats and was a precursor to hip-hop. The rap on this track is courtesy of The Watts Prophets;  Q has often remarked that his generation and their fascination with be-bop is echoed in today’s hip-hop culture. The difference, he writes, is that hip-hop made it to the mainstream.

“Give Me the Night,” George Benson, 1980 [PD] // The only album Jones produced for Benson garnered three Grammy awards. The title track, which topped both R&B and Jazz charts was written by Rod Temperton. 

“Back on the Block,” Quincy Jones, 1989 [PD] // Jones won yet more Grammy’s, including Album of the Year, for this fantastic project that brought together masters of jazz and a newer generation of hip-hop artists. The album included a re-imagined version of Weather Report’s Birdland and featured its composer and Miles Davis protegee, Joseph Zawinul. Other greats like Ray Charles, Chaka Khan, George Benson and Miles himself also appeared on the album. 

“The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air,” DJ Jazzy Jeff and The Fresh Prince, 1992 [CP] // By this time, Jones had diversified into print media (Vibe Magazine) and numerous projects under his Qwest production banner. This foray into television was tremendously successful and, like many things Jones touched, made an indelible mark on pop culture.

“How Do You Want It,” 2Pac, 1996 // Tupac Shakur happened to date one of Jones’ daughters for a time. This track samples the title track from Jones’ Body Heat album and was released not long before Tupac’s murder.

“Setembro,” Quincy Jones, 1989 [PD] // This was the last recording by Sarah Vaughan; Jones has outlived many of his contemporaries and mentors; He was at Sinatra’s bedside in his final days and with Vaughan, who wanted to sing to the last.

 

Link to this playlist on Spotify

Concert Review: Stevie Wonder, Songs in the Key of Life: The Performance (Toronto, Air Canada Centre, November 25 2014)

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Stevie Wonder is one of those musicians who is prone to being taken for granted. He has been around long enough to be a household name across three generations of music lovers and he is still performing.

Wonder’s concert on Tuesday night in Toronto was a stirring reminder that he and his body of work are so much more than a familiar background. It was especially fitting that he chose to perform his 1976 masterpiece, Songs in the Key of Life (Motown) for this 11 city tour. Songs is one of the most celebrated albums in pop music, voted to the top of numerous lists, including Grammy for album of the year in 1977 against now legendary competition like George Benson’s Breezin (Warner Bros., 1976), Bozz Scagg’s Silk Degrees (Columbia, 1976), and the rock classic Frampton Comes Alive! (A&M, 1976).

With this tour, Wonder brings this work to new life in the vibrancy of a live show. This is where Wonder’s currency hits home. He is, above all, a great songwriter and musician. This show proved it all over again.

Wonder performed the entirety of the album, mostly in order, including the four extra tracks on the special edition of the album. The concert’s run time was 3 hours including a short intermission and an encore.

Aside from the songs themselves, the performances of Wonder and his collaborators made this a simply excellent show. Wonder’s energy and power never waned, despite a slight hoarseness in his speaking voice when addressing the audience between songs. Original session musicians from Songs, Greg Phillinganes (keyboards) and Nathan Watts (bass guitar), were among the 30+ musicians sharing the stage, including an 8-piece string section sourced locally in Toronto, a 6 piece horn section, 6 back-up singers, 2 drummers, and 2 percussionists.

Wonder’s special guest for the tour is vocalist India.Arie, who complemented Wonder on several duets. More remarkable, however, was Keith John, one of the back-up singers who engaged in an impressive ad lib call-and-response with Wonder at the end of “Knocks Me Off My Feet.” John, who is 1950’s Motown singer Little Willie John’s son, has a voice like Wonder’s that offered a seamless boost to some of the most acrobatic vocal passages of the night, including the layered climax of “As.”

Other memorable moments of the night:

  • Three of the back-up singers, including Aisha Morris (Wonder’s daughter and muse of “Isn’t She Lovely”) took turns belting out the hard hitting coda of “Ordinary Pain.”
  • “Ngiculela-Es Una Historia-I Am Singing” featured a playful sing-a-long with the audience and a mezmorizing harpejji solo (zither-like instrument Wonder started playing 2-3 years ago) blended with a few phrases of Michael Jackson’s “The Way You Make Me Feel.”
  • Wonder challenged members of the string section to an impromptu jam. He proceeded to play a few phrases and was responded to in kind by the first violinist who echoed them on his instrument.
  • The encore was a medley of hits from other albums. Wonder chose to adopt a tongue-in-cheek hip-hop persona, dubbed DJ Tick Tick Boom, as the emcee of the proceedings. The segment was hammed up enough to distance itself from the solemnity of the Songs performance but done in a way that allowed the audience to hear some other favourites.

Like many others, I’ve always recognized Stevie Wonder as a “living legend.” But at some point during the show, ‘knowing’ this as a matter of common knowledge paled in comparison to bearing witness. Now I really get it.

SET LIST (from setlist.fm):

  1. Love’s in Need of Love Today
  2. Have a Talk With God
  3. Village Ghetto Land
  4. Contusion
  5. Sir Duke
  6. I Wish
  7. Knocks Me Off My Feet w/Fever
  8. Pastime Paradise
  9. Summer Soft
  10. Ordinary Pain
  11. Saturn
  12. Ebony Eyes
  13. Isn’t She Lovely
  14. Joy Inside My Tears
  15. Black Man
  16. All Day Sucker
  17. Easy Goin’ Evening (My Mama’s Call)
  18. Ngiculela – Es Una Historia – I Am Singing / The Way You Make Me Feel
  19. If It’s Magic
  20. As
  21. Another Star

ENCORE: DJ Tick Tick Boom (AKA Wonder) plays recorded snippets of various hits

  1. Don’t You Worry ‘Bout A Thing
  2. I Just Called To Say I Love You
  3. Master Blaster (Jammin’)
  4. Do I Do
  5. For Once in My Life
  6. Superstition

 

Album Review: People of Tomorrow, Citrus Sun (Dome Records, 2014)

Citrus-sun-albumIt took me a while to come to this album produced by Incognito’s Jean-Paul ‘Bluey’ Maunick. I was reluctant not because I had any doubts it would be good but because it was immediately swept into the “smooth jazz” realm. I have a tentative relationship with that genre. On the one hand, Incognito’s instrumental work and other artists who have attracted that descriptor (e.g. George Benson, Bob James) have created an amazing body of work that respects jazz’ tradition while embracing elements of soul, funk, and even pop music. On the other hand, there is a sizeable slice of “smooth jazz” that remains bland and formulaic.

People of Tomorrow falls easily into the first category – great jazz music with latin and soul influences. But it wasn’t until a recent listen to the track, “Yesterday Detroit” did it hit me why this album is special. At times, it rekindles a sound in jazz music that Donald Byrd and the Mizell Brothers perfected some 30 years ago. Having just lost Donald Byrd last year, it’s a fitting tribute, even if unintentional.

Listening to “Yesterday Detroit,” Domenic Glover’s trumpet solos are reminiscent of Byrd’s expansive style. The title track is similarly steeped in Glover’s trumpet. Combined with steady rhythm tracks and funk-inspired arrangements, the sonic landscape of a classic album like Byrd’s Places & Spaces (Blue Note, 1975) springs into new life. Remarkable.

Featured on most tracks is Jim Mullen, a veteran of the jazz guitar. Comparisons to Wes Montgomery are not coincidental. Like Montgomery did, Mullen picks with his thumb and his style is just as fluid as Montgomery’s. The lead track, “Mais Uma Vez (One More Time)” opens with an addictive melody, expands into a luxurious solo by Glover, and closes with a Mullen solo so cheerfully easy going, you can see the smile on his face as you listen.

In a promotional interview on the project, Maunick cited a Herbie Mann album someone gifted him as the inspiration for the latin jazz elements on the album. Although he didn’t name the album, my guess is he was talking about Do the Bossa Nova with Herbie Mann, originally released in 1963 (Atlantic reissue, 2005).

People of Tomorrow manages considerable breadth in its 10 tracks. As well as the latin influence and contemporary jazz tracks, “Cooking with Walter” offers a more uptempo, dance-inspired sound, not unlike what we might hear as an Incognito instrumental (fans of the TV series Breaking Bad will get the title).

Still, I have to come back to the Byrd comparison, which somehow makes me more welcoming of a new smooth jazz record. It reminds me that smooth jazz, like its ancestor, can be great given the right songwriting and musicianship. People of Tomorrow has both in spades.

The Players: Jean-Paul ‘Bluey’ Maunick – Guitar; Jim Mullen – featured Guitar; Matt Cooper – Keyboards, Piano, Fender Rhodes, Drums; Domenic Glover – Trumpet, Trombone; Pete Ray Biggin – Drums; Richard Bull – Drums, Acoustic Guitar, Keyboards, Organ, Percussion; Joao Caetano – Percussion; Randy Hope-Taylor – Bass; Francis Hylton – Bass, Drums, Guitar, Keyboards, Piano; Francesco Mendolia – Drums; Valerie Etienne – Vocals.

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Playlist: Harvey Mason – Jazz’s tightest drummer

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Harvey Mason

We all have our ‘go to’ answers when someone asks, “who’s your favourite drummer?” My mind always goes to the rock genre after which it takes about 0.3 seconds to arrive at Keith Moon (Bonham and Peart are a close second and third). But if asked who my favourite jazz drummer was, I’d probably run through my relatively short mental Rolodex and offer up Art Blakey, mostly because Buddy Rich is too predictable and Gene Krupa was more known for big band than modern jazz.

However, I’ve recently discovered the man behind the drum kit in many of my favourite jazz and jazz fusion recordings. Now I have my stock answer:

Harvey Mason is my favourite jazz drummer.

To celebrate his breadth and illuminate an astounding career (still in progress), I thought I’d share a short playlist.

    1. Donald Byrd, Street Lady, Flight Time (Blue Note, 1973)
    2. Herbie Hancock, Head Hunters, Watermelon Man (Columbia, 1973)+
    3. Grover Washington Jr., A Secret Place, Love Makes it Better (Kudu, 1976)*
    4. Donald Byrd, Stepping into Tomorrow, Stepping into Tomorrow (Blue Note, 1975)
    5. Bobbi Humphrey, Blacks and Blues, Harlem River Drive (Blue Note, 1973)
    6. George Benson, Breezin’, Breezin’ (Warner Bros., 1976)
    7. Harvey Mason, Earthmover, K.Y. and the Curve (Arista, 1976)*
    8. Harvey Mason, Funk in a Mason Jar, Til You Take My Love (Arista, 1977)*+
    9. Bob James, Three, Westchester Lady (CTI, 1976)
    10. Fourplay, Esprit de Four, Sonnymoon (Concord Music, 2012)

*Song co-written by Mason; +Song arranged by Mason

Track 1 is Donald Byrd’s “Flight Time,” which features Mason in what I think is one of the greatest jazz drum lines ever. Like the other Mizell Brothers’ produced tracks on this list (nos. 4 & 5), Mason provides a tight and driving backdrop to an easy going groove.

As if working with Byrd and the Mizells wasn’t impressive enough, in the same year Mason also appeared on Herbie Hancock’s seminal album, Head Hunters. Not only is he responsible for the steady hand we hear on the monster jazz/funk fusion hit, “Chamaeleon” but he also arranged and performed on “Watermelon Man,” track 2 of our tour. Mason brought innovative funk treatments to the song, which had been in Hancock’s repertoire for 10 years before this most famous version was recorded.

Continuing his association with those who would become synonymous with jazz fusion and jazz-funk, Mason appeared on Grover Washington Jr.’s classic, Mister Magic. Track 3 on my playlist is a lesser known track from Mason’s stint with Washington: “Love Makes it Better.” Mason penned this song, which suits both his and Washington’s style. Mason’s rhythm track grounds the song, allowing the Washington to soar freely in his solos.

Tracks 4 & 5 are from the golden era of Larry and Fonce Mizell at Blue Note Records. Donald Byrd’s “Stepping into Tomorrow” and Bobbi Humphrey’s “Harlem River Drive” are both classic Mizell Brothers tunes. One of the reasons they endure today is because of Mason’s performance. “Stepping into Tomorrow,” with its menacing bassline, rolls along with the Mizell’s lush arrangements filling in the spaces. The song’s foundation is Mason’s flawless and relentless rhythm track. On “Harlem River Drive,” Mason does what great drummers do most of the time, which is play well without being noticed.

George Benson’s classic recording of the Bobby Womack song, “Breezin'” is track 6. It’s hard to find a more iconic track from the seventies. Moving away from more traditional jazz or jazz-funk arrangements, George Benson broke new ground with this release, crossing over into pop whilst applying jazz instrumentation. Again, Mason’s playing underpins Benson’s melodic guitar lines and keeps the listener engaged throughout the nearly six minute track.

earthmoverMason’s solo career is as long and distinguished as his time as a sideman. The next two tracks come from an era of soulful funk and disco which saw Mason branch out into popular music with vocals and higher production values. Tracks 7 & 8, “K.Y. and the Curve” and “Til You Take My Love” are joyful tracks incorporating the best from that era, including great string arrangements, funk-inspired guitar lines, and ensemble vocals (including Mason himself on “K.Y. and the Curve”).

masonjarTrack 9 is Bob James’ broadly recognizable, “Westchester Lady,” another anthem from the 1970’s. Mason’s timing is impeccable, interplaying with James’ stacatto keyboards and his punchy horn section.

Closing the playlist is a track that returns us to the jazz fusion genre, which Mason has helped define through the decades. Fourplay’s “Sonnymoon” (track 10) is more straight ahead jazz than much of their repertoire. Mason’s playing is as tight as ever, despite having just become a ‘senior citizen’ at 65 when this track was released in 2012.

Mason’s career continues today. He will be recording a new CD this year under his “Chamaeleon Project” monicker.

Who’s your favourite jazz drummer?

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Album Review: Places & Spaces, Donald Byrd, 1975 (Blue Note)

This album from trumpeter Donald Byrd is one for the ages.  Easy-going string and flute arrangements give this record a breeziness that became the soundtrack of the 70s.

Production team, Larry and Alphonso ‘Fonce’ Mizell, were behind many of the jazz/funk fusion artists of the decade, including flautist Bobbi Humphrey, the Jackson 5, and disco sensation A Taste of Honey.

What’s remarkable about this album is not its innovation but rather how it capitalized on the jazz fusion movement that was well in-flight at the time.

Jazz fusion is said to have been born with Miles Davis’ Bitches Brew (Sony, 1970). It’s true that Davis was the preeminent innovator that reinvented jazz, most notably with the introduction of electronic instruments.

However, Byrd and the Mizells created a much more accessible sub-genre, one I would liken more to pop than Davis’ brand of esoteric fusion. Like George Benson’s Breezin’ (Warner Bros., 1976), this record uses jazz instrumentation and improvised solos within the construct of a pop song. Incidentally, the Mizell brothers used a stable of studio musicians on all of their Blue Note hits, drummer Harvey Mason being one of them. Mason appeared on Benson’s Breezin’ and Herbie Hancock’s Headhunters (Blue Note, 1973), both mammoth records in the evolution of jazz (read my review of Herbie Hancock’s Headhunters here).

In a way, this album is just as daring as a grand opus like Bitches Brew. Just as Davis turned his back on the traditionalists of the golden era of jazz, Byrd moved forward by embracing pop forms that would eventually morph into disco. Byrd risked rejection from two sides: the jazz world who would view him as a sellout; and the pop world, to whom he likely appeared as a ‘square’ at the time.

Byrd could have done worse than to give over the production reigns to his one-time students, the Mizell Brothers. As it happens, it was exactly the right move. A double legacy was his reward: this classic album and a signature sound that defined a decade in music.

Feature: Jazz Guitar – A Family Tree

I’ve recently become re-enamoured with Kenny Burrell’s music. He is a remarkably naturalistic jazz guitarist who is still going strong today. Most would reference Midnight Blue (Blue Note, 1963) as a definitive record for him. It is certainly one of the finer jazz recordings in my collection. But my favourite, 1985’s Togethering with Grover Washington Jr., is no longer on issue from Blue Note.  There’s something about that recording that brings Burrell’s talent into vivid focus. It is mostly an upbeat record with more of a bossa feel than his other work. The duets with Washington are clearly the work of two masters in perfect tune with one another.

In my as yet fruitless search for downloads of this album, I’ve gleaned other guitarists of his ilk and mapped out a musical family tree that may help those of you wishing to broaden your jazz guitar collection.

Which “Jazz Guitar” am I talking about?

Jazz is such a broad genre and anyone writing about “Jazz Guitar” is prone to boiling the ocean. I’ll draw my boundaries around those musicians who play the archtop guitar also known as the “jazzbox.” I’ll further narrow focus on those who play their guitars in the context of primarily improvised jazz music with traditional band make-ups such as jazz trios, quartets etc.

For this reason, you won’t find mention of some notable electric guitar ambassadors like Chet Atkins, Les Paul, Pat Metheny, and Stanley Jordan.

It all started with…(well, it depends on who you ask)

Many histories of the jazz guitar name Django Reinhardt as one of the founding fathers of the instrument. Indeed, he was a pioneer. But his influence on the particular genre of guitar characterized by Kenny Burrell’s music was indirect, in my opinion. His was more influenced by Roma folk music and closer to flamenco than jazz.

Next in line is Charlie Christian and this is where the family tree really begins. Christian played in Benny Goodman’s big band and was one of the first to successfully feature the guitar as a bonafide solo instrument. Before then, the guitar was on the fringe of the then popular big band sound.

Christian was an influence on Wes Montgomery, who is also touted as the patriarch of the jazz guitar family. If Charlie Christian brought the instrument into the listener’s mainstream, it was Montgomery who made young musicians want to play it, and play it like him.

Kenny Burrell and the Golden Age of Jazz

To me, the 1950s and 60s were the Golden age of jazz music. These were the years of timeless Blue Note recordings, innovative arrangements, and a cross-pollination of side-men and leaders that marked a prolific era in music.

As a sideman, Kenny Burrell played with Oscar Peterson. He recorded with many of the greats of that era including Dizzy Gillespie and John Coltrane. In his own right, Burrell recorded many albums through the decades and has also become a beloved music educator.

Another notable of this era is Joe Pass, who played along side Frank Sinatra, Sarah Vaughan, and most notably, Ella Fitizgerald. He was celebrated for his technique which broke new ground in the use of chord melodies, inversions, and progressions.

Lenny Breau, another peculiarly talented technician on the guitar, flew under the radar in Canada for many years, surfacing from time to time to play on Canadian television. His first LP, Guitar Sounds from Lenny Breau (RCA, 1968) was the fruit of a friendship he had struck with Chet Atkins in the late 60s.

Jazz on Acid

As Jazz’ popularity was overtaken by rock and roll, and then funk and disco, there were a few trailblazers who pulled at the fringes of jazz to modernize it. Herbie Hancock was certainly the ringleader and was criticized by essentialists who didn’t understand his vision. Admittedly, Jazz can be utterly butchered if it is ‘modernized’ in a careless way. But Hancock had an old school pedigree and was successful, on more than one occasion, in making jazz relevant for a new generation.

While Hancock was leading a piano/keyboard revolution, George Benson did his part for the jazz guitar. By combining soulful vocals, tunes with an R&B sensability, and his jazz guitar sound, Benson mashed up the genres and made the jazz cross-over possible. Breezin’ (Warner Bros., 1976) may be overplayed and evoke a passe disco sound by today’s standards but it is an important milestone, if only for the success it had in using a decidedly jazz sound in popular music.

Benson opened the door but it was Ronny Jordan who many point to as the flagbearer of the new genre that was given the unfortunate and meaningless moniker, Acid Jazz (I could go on about how I love acid jazz music but abhor the label…but that is an entirely different subject). By the time of Jordan’s first release, The Antidote (Island, 1992), hip-hop had taken a firm hold on popular music. Rather than isolating himself from it, Jordan embraced it, and collaborated on all of his albums with producers and hip-hop artists who were able to fuse jazz, funk, and hip-hop in a natural way.

Take Your Pick

Whether you discover someone else or pick one of the guitarists I cite above in my short and humble history, I hope you’ll find your own joy in the wonder of a jazzbox in the right hands.

Notable Jazz Guitarists of the 20th Century

Django Reinhardt (b. 1910, d. 1953) – active in the 30s and 40s, gypsy style, flamenco influence

Charlie Christian (b. 1916, d. 1942) – played with Benny Goodman starting in 1939; influenced more by horn players; not influenced by Django

Tal Farlow (b. 1921, d. 1998) – played with Mingus and Artie Shaw

Johnny Smith (b. 1922) – active in the 40s and 50s; played with Count Basie and Stan Getz

Wes Montgomery (b. 1923, d. 1968) – recorded in 50s and 60s; influenced many guitarists after him

Barney Kessell (b. 1923, d. 2004) – played with Charlie Parker, Ray Brown, and Oscar Peterson

Joe Pass (b. 1929, d. 1994) – active from the 40s through his death in 94; recorded and played with Ella Fitgerald

Kenny Burrell (b. 1931) – active from the 50s to present day

Lenny Breau (b. 1941, d. 1984) – not as prolific as his predecessors but respected by many as an innovator

George Benson (b. 1943) – active from 1954 to present day, crossover into R&B, acid jazz

Pat Metheny (b. 1954) – identified with jazz fusion; not known for “jazzbox” but mostly the solid body electric guitar

Stanley Jordan (b. 1959) – innovative finger tapping style; classical guitar sensibility

Ronny Jordan (b. 1962) – acid jazz pioneer; fusion with hip-hop

Russell Malone (b. 1963) – straight ahead jazz player, taking up the torch from Montgomery and Burrell; toured with the great organist, Jimmy Smith