Archives for posts with tag: Daft Punk

2013 in Review: New, New to Me, and Those We Lost

There were many solid new releases this past year and many had two things in common. First, they were introduced to me via Gilles Peterson’s (@gillespeterson) BBC6 program, Worldwide, a staple in my listening. Second, three of my top 5 were released on Blue Note Records.

New Releases:

Looking back just 12 months, there were so many good albums released that I had enough fodder for a top 10, with Omar’s The Man winning the year.

10. Kon, On My Way
9. Brand New Heavies, Forward
8. Mario Biondi, Sun
7. Alice Russell, To Dust
6. Ed Motta, AOR
5. Jean-Paul ‘Bluey’ Maunick, Leap of Faith
4. Jose James, No Beginning No End
3. Robert Glasper Experiment, Black Radio 2
2. Gregory Porter, Liquid Spirit
1. Omar, The Man

Other notable releases were Quadron’s Avalanche, Da Lata’s Fabiola, Daft Punk’s Random Access Memories, RC & the Gritz’ Pay Your Tab, and Wild Belle’s Isles.

New to me: Rediscovered

Chakha Khan & Rufus – Before Chakha Khan’s 80’s resurgence, her career was launched with the 70’s funk and soul band, Rufus. Their album, Street Player (UMG Recordings, 1978) is a particularly good showcase of the bands smoothness and how well suited Khan’s vocal style is to their music. The track, “Destiny,” is essential listening.

Harvey Mason – I posted a Harvey Mason playlist after discovering this drummer who made his mark on numerous jazz and fusion classics.

Skee-Lo – An oddball find from 1995 when hip-hop albums were so prolific that it was hard to cut through the clutter to find those that would last. Skee-Lo’s album, I Wish (Ultra Moda Music, 1995) holds up today with its pleasing blend of melody and rhyme. It’s also a hip-hop album that’s not afraid to have some fun.

Ben l’Oncle Soul – Neo soul has been played out in my books for some time now. But Ben L’Oncle Soul’s self-titled release (Mercury Music Group, 2010) had a fresh take because a) it’s mostly sung in French; and b) the artist makes the music his own, not trying to mimic crooners from the 60’s and 70’s but celebrating his voice and music in his own way.

Notable Passings

  • Donald Byrd – One of my musical heros. An innovator and prolific melodist. Tributes to him abound on the internet as the year closes out. Nice to see him getting such wide recognition.
  • Stompin’ Tom Connors – A Canadian folk music treasure whose lyrics and music are essential Canadiana
  • George Duke – A keyboardist and innovator in the vein of Donald Byrd and Herbie Hancock
  • Lou Reed – Another innovator and catalyst who influenced rock and punk acts through the 70s and 80s

Most Anticipated in 2014

Q-Tip, The Last Zulu – This project has been on the radar for some time now but it’s hard to nail down a release date amongst the hype out there. The album is said to include, in some form, a reunion of original A Tribe Called Quest members.

Zara McFarlane, If You Knew Her – The follow-up from her excellent 2011 debut Until Tomorrow (Brownswood)

Jose James – His second release on the Blue Note label is in production, according to James’ facebook updates.

Prince, Plectrum Electrum – The recently released (and excellent) single, “Breakfast Can Wait,” will be on the album as will tracks featuring the rock-centered 3rd Eye Girl who are touring with Prince.

Happy, peaceful, and musical New Year!

Album Review: Random Access Memories, Daft Punk (Daft Life Limited/Columbia Records, 2013)

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I am very late to the party on this one. Daft Punk gained a loyal following after their debut release, Homework (Daft Life/Virgin, 1997) and grew into a techno/house mega-act after 2001’s Discovery (Daft Life, Virgin). But not until their hotly anticipated Random Access Memories (Daft Life/Columbia, 2013) started making waves did I come upon this synth duo from France.

Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo and Thomas Bangalter (a.k.a. Daft Punk) helped shape the French House music scene in the 1990’s and innovated their own brand of synth pop and techno through futuristic synth sounds and the extensive use of the vocoder. The duo uses robot costumes in their performances, which are the finishing touch to Daft Punk as a concept band.

Random Access Memories, much like Homework and Discovery, has a range of music that will appeal to different tastes. There are pure synth arrangements like “Contact,” “Motherboard,” and “Giorgio by Moroder,” the latter featuring a monologue from electronic music pioneer Giorgio Moroder, who the band no doubt holds in high regard.

Pop features prominently as well. The first single, “Get Lucky,” featuring Pharrell Williams, reached #1 in the UK and has the best hook we’ve heard in a long time from Nile Rodgers, whose funky guitar lines are also prominent on “Give Life Back to Music.” But even Rodgers can’t save some of the more repetitive songs like “Lose Yourself to Dance” and “Doin’ it Right.” These tracks lack the dynamism of Daft Punk’s better work, offering only flat and trudging choruses.

More downtempo tracks like “Instant Crush,” “Beyond,” “The Game of Love,” and “Within” range from nice ballads to more experimental outings. “Touch,” featuring 70’s songwriter Paul Williams is one such experiment that has its moments but ultimately leaves the listener wondering how it made the cut in its current form.

The surprise of the lot is “Fragments of Time,” featuring the vocals of American house producer Todd Edwards. This track evokes a beautiful 70’s progressive soft rock vibe (like dare I say, Steely Dan). Edwards’ vocals are front-and-centre and the synth effects are reigned in as tasteful accompaniment. It’s the standout track on the album, even moreso than “Get Lucky.”

I don’t normally write about mainstream music so this post has turned out to be  somewhat of an accident. When I started tracking Daft Punk some months ago, I didn’t realize how big they were and what a massive pop record this would become. The marketing machine behind it included a viral video campaign with mini documentaries featuring each of the collaborators on the album (this one with Giorgio Moroder is particularly interesting). TV ads were run and I recently found it featured in a Target flyer, of all places.

Although Daft Punk is not something I would normally place in my musical wheelhouse, I made some nice discoveries not only on this album but also from their back catalog. I’m glad I ran into them.