Archives for posts with tag: Brand New Heavies

2013 in Review: New, New to Me, and Those We Lost

There were many solid new releases this past year and many had two things in common. First, they were introduced to me via Gilles Peterson’s (@gillespeterson) BBC6 program, Worldwide, a staple in my listening. Second, three of my top 5 were released on Blue Note Records.

New Releases:

Looking back just 12 months, there were so many good albums released that I had enough fodder for a top 10, with Omar’s The Man winning the year.

10. Kon, On My Way
9. Brand New Heavies, Forward
8. Mario Biondi, Sun
7. Alice Russell, To Dust
6. Ed Motta, AOR
5. Jean-Paul ‘Bluey’ Maunick, Leap of Faith
4. Jose James, No Beginning No End
3. Robert Glasper Experiment, Black Radio 2
2. Gregory Porter, Liquid Spirit
1. Omar, The Man

Other notable releases were Quadron’s Avalanche, Da Lata’s Fabiola, Daft Punk’s Random Access Memories, RC & the Gritz’ Pay Your Tab, and Wild Belle’s Isles.

New to me: Rediscovered

Chakha Khan & Rufus – Before Chakha Khan’s 80’s resurgence, her career was launched with the 70’s funk and soul band, Rufus. Their album, Street Player (UMG Recordings, 1978) is a particularly good showcase of the bands smoothness and how well suited Khan’s vocal style is to their music. The track, “Destiny,” is essential listening.

Harvey Mason – I posted a Harvey Mason playlist after discovering this drummer who made his mark on numerous jazz and fusion classics.

Skee-Lo – An oddball find from 1995 when hip-hop albums were so prolific that it was hard to cut through the clutter to find those that would last. Skee-Lo’s album, I Wish (Ultra Moda Music, 1995) holds up today with its pleasing blend of melody and rhyme. It’s also a hip-hop album that’s not afraid to have some fun.

Ben l’Oncle Soul – Neo soul has been played out in my books for some time now. But Ben L’Oncle Soul’s self-titled release (Mercury Music Group, 2010) had a fresh take because a) it’s mostly sung in French; and b) the artist makes the music his own, not trying to mimic crooners from the 60’s and 70’s but celebrating his voice and music in his own way.

Notable Passings

  • Donald Byrd – One of my musical heros. An innovator and prolific melodist. Tributes to him abound on the internet as the year closes out. Nice to see him getting such wide recognition.
  • Stompin’ Tom Connors – A Canadian folk music treasure whose lyrics and music are essential Canadiana
  • George Duke – A keyboardist and innovator in the vein of Donald Byrd and Herbie Hancock
  • Lou Reed – Another innovator and catalyst who influenced rock and punk acts through the 70s and 80s

Most Anticipated in 2014

Q-Tip, The Last Zulu – This project has been on the radar for some time now but it’s hard to nail down a release date amongst the hype out there. The album is said to include, in some form, a reunion of original A Tribe Called Quest members.

Zara McFarlane, If You Knew Her – The follow-up from her excellent 2011 debut Until Tomorrow (Brownswood)

Jose James – His second release on the Blue Note label is in production, according to James’ facebook updates.

Prince, Plectrum Electrum – The recently released (and excellent) single, “Breakfast Can Wait,” will be on the album as will tracks featuring the rock-centered 3rd Eye Girl who are touring with Prince.

Happy, peaceful, and musical New Year!

Album Review: The Secret Life of Us, Joey Negro & The Sunburst Band (Z Records, 2012)

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U.K. producer Joey Negro (a.k.a. Dave Lee) has a knack for recreating 70’s funk/disco zeitgeist with a contemporary dance sensibility. This is the fourth album from his Sunburst Band incarnation and its most uplifting and danceable collection.

Missing from this album is some of the innovation we saw in earlier releases which experimented quite brilliantly, with some jazz and electronic fusion. Notably, Until the end of Time from 2004 featured a sensational ode to Ahmad Jamal in the track “Far Beyond,” borrowing Jamal’s climax from his opus, “Swahililand.”

To be fair, there are indeed some unconventional tracks here, including “Jazz the DMX,” a jazz fusion overtop dance beats and “Educated Funk,” a trancey interlude, showcasing some of the talented players in the band, such as bassist Julian Crampton.

Former Incognito guitarist, Tony Remy, also makes his mark, especially in his easy-going rhythm track on “Opus de Soul.”

This album is at its best though across the generous collection of dance tracks that blend soulful house and jazz/funk elements. “In the Thick of It” is a brilliant opener with a nice bossa outro. The title track, sung in duet by Donna Gardier and Diane Charlemagne, is a great melody, reminiscent of Incognito and the Brand New Heavies, circa 1995.

As well as an impressive line-up of vocalists, what stands out are the keyboards of Michele Chiavarini. I don’t think I’ve heard this much use of a bender since 1982! “Where the Lights Meet the Music” showcases Chiavarini’s style, which rekindles the early 80’s pop/funk sound innovated by D-Train keyboardist, Hubert Eaves III.

“Caught in the Moment” uses the Doobie Brothers “What a Fool Believes” rhythm track, continuing a series from prior releases that paid homage to classics. Namely, “Atlantic Forest” from Here Comes the Sunburst Band (1998) is a nod to Paul Hardcastle’s “Rainforest.” And “We Will Turn You On” from Until the End of Time pays tribute to CHIC’s “Good Times” rhythm.

It’s remarkable that a producer as prolific as Lee has managed to keep this outfit together over its now 15 year history. Releasing an album about every 4 years shows confidence, that their music, like its 70’s pedigree, will continue to make people move.

Players:

Dave Lee (producer), Michele Chiavarini (keys), Julian Crampton (bass), Thomas Dyani-Akuru (percussion), Tony Remy (guitar), Pete Simpson (vocals), Frank Tontoh (drums)