Archives for posts with tag: Ashley Henry

Best of 2019

Unlike 2018’s deluge, new music crept up on me this year. It was a steady stream of high quality albums and songs, with a few surprises. Album of the year for me was Beautiful Vinyl Hunter from UK jazz pianist, Ashley Henry. The new album from my all-time favourite band,  Incognito, Tomorrow’s New Dream places a close second.

Herbie Hancock | Kamasi Washington, Toronto August 7 2019

I saw a good amount of live music. My sophomore experience with Herbie Hancock had an added bonus with Terrace Martin in his touring band. It was also a double-bill with Kamasi Washington, so yeah, concert of the year. I also enjoyed Toronto’s own Daniel Caesar on a chilly autumn night at Toronto’s Budweiser Stage. Opening for him, another personal favourite, Charlotte Day Wilson.

A couple of surprises were albums from Sara Bareilles and the Spoons. I had never heard of Bareilles until I saw her perform on Saturday Night Live. Her album, Amidst the Chaos, really resonated with me, which was a little surprising since it is bordering on country, a genre I don’t usually explore or focus on. When I discovered T-Bone Burnett produced Bareilles’ album, it all made sense (I’m a fan of his musical direction on the now defunct TV show, Nashville). Another pleasant surprise was New Day New World from the Spoons, a band I’ve followed since I was in my teens. Late comers in the year were from Kaytranada (BUBBA, Kaytranada Music) and what seems like an independent and mostly instrumental release, Visions, from Jarrod Lawson on his bandcamp page, released under the artist name, Orpheus.

Albums

  1. Ashley Henry, Beautiful Vinyl Hunter (Sony Music)
  2. Incognito, Tomorrow’s New Dream (Bluey Music)
  3. Daniel Caesar, Case Study 01 (Golden Child Recordings)
  4. Salaam Remi & Terrace Martin, Northside of Linden, Westside of Slauson (Flying Buddha / Louder Than Life)
  5. Taylor McFerrin, Love’s Last Chance (FromHereEntertainment)
  6. Daniel Maunick, Macumba Quebrada (Far Out Recordings)
  7. Shafiq Husayn, The Loop (Nature Sounds)
  8. Shigeto, Versions EP (Ghostly International)
  9. Sara Bareilles, Amidst the Chaos (Epic)
  10. Flying Lotus, Flamagra (Warp Records)
  11. Jarrod Lawson, Visions (jlawson.bandcamp.com)
  12. Spoons, New Day New World (Sparks Music)
  13. Marcos Valle, Sempre (Conecta)

 

Songs (Listen to this playlist on Spotify)

My favourite songs of the year were from a wide swath of artists, some of them new to me this year. I was really taken with “Flying,” by Dawn Tallman. It’s a beautifully written, produced, and performed song. Tony Momrelle’s duet with his Incognito compadre, Maysa, is another. Jazz trumpeter, Yazz Ahmed was a new discovery for me this year. Her Arabic-influenced and atmospheric jazz is a fresh sound. There are some selections from the dance/house genre as well, “Sim City” being one of my favourites from the year.

  1. Flying, Dawn Tallman, For Me (Honeycomb Music)
  2. We Had Searched for Heaven, Tony Momrelle feat. Maysa, Best is Yet to Come (Vibe 45 Records)
  3. What You Need, Kaytranada & Charlotte Day Wilson, BUBBA (Kaytranada Music)
  4. Sim City, Space Ghost, Aquarium Nightclub (Tartelet Records)
  5. Don’t Stop, Monodeluxe & Jaidene Veda (Vibe Boutique Records)
  6. Lahan al Mansour, Yazz Ahmed, Polyhymnia (Ropeadope)
  7. To B, Da Lata, Birds (Da Lata Music)
  8. Dance with You, Sunlightsquare feat. Omar, Dance with You EP (Sunlightsquare Records)
  9. Afeni, Rapsody feat. PJ Morton, Eve (Jamla Records)
  10. Mesosphere, Ryan Porter, Force for Good (World Galaxy / Alpha Pup Records)
  11. Life is a Dancefloor feat. Kimberly Davis, Shapeshifters (Glitterbox Recordings)
  12. How Long Does it Take, Mildlife (Heavenly Recordings)
  13. Asa no Yume, Mark de Clive-Lowe, Heritage (Ropeadope)

 

New to Me (Re)discovered

Photo: patricerushen.com

In September of this year, BBC’s Gilles Peterson hosted an all vinyl special of his must-listen radio show with Patrice Rushen as his guest. Until then, I thought Forget Me Nots (and its ubiquitous sampling) was her singular claim to fame.

After I heard the program, I rushed to explore the rest of her catalogue and was bowled over by the impact she has made on jazz, R&B, and funk. Do yourself a favour listen to a Patrice Rushen marathon on your favourite streaming service or better yet, buy some albums. My current favourites are Patrice (Elektra, 1978), Pizzazz (Elektra, 1979), and Straight from the Heart (Elektra, 1982). Ms Rushen is still an active musician and music educator.

 

Passings

Some notable losses to the world of music this year: Ranking Roger of The English Beat and General Public, Johnny Clegg of Juluka and Savuka, Art Neville of the Neville Brothers, and Canada’s own John Mann, of Spirit of the West.

Aaron Neville. Photo: Erika Goldring/Getty Images

 

Anticipating in 2020

Terrace Martin has been hinting on his social media for some time that he has been working on his new album, DRONES. I’m also keen to see what Martin will do as producer on Herbie Hancock’s next album, which is also reportedly in the works.

 

Album Review: Beautiful Vinyl Hunter, Ashley Henry (Sony Music, September 2019)

Beautiful Vinyl Hunter is Ashley Henry’s debut full-length album. Having just celebrated his 28th birthday, Henry has produced an album rich beyond his years.

Listening end to end, three modes emerge on this album. Contemporary piano jazz leads off with “STAR CHILD” featuring Judi Jackson on vocals. Jackson also appears on “Lullaby (Rise and Shine),” which sounds like it came out of the Cole Porter songbook. “Cranes (In the Sky)” is an upbeat piano jazz anthem, not unlike something you might hear from Shaun Martin. My favourite track in the jazz mode of this album is “Ahmed.” The melody, rhythm, and improvisation stand up to repeated listens and remind you why the piano is perhaps the most expansive instrument in jazz music.

Henry’s second mode is hip hop, with tracks like “Between the Lines” featuring Keyon Harrold and “COLORS” featuring Joshua Idehen. They meld seamlessly into the album’s soundscape, ever decorated by Henry’s keyboard work.

The third mode is electric. Henry plays a Rhodes electric piano for tracks like “Introspection” and “Dark Honey (4thestorm),” echoing atmospheric 1970s fusion.

Already in his young career, Ashley Henry has cultivated a sound and shown us he knows how to use a range of collaborations and styles to create an irresistible work.